Does your baby have a fever as soon as he has teeth? Multiple studies suggest it's just a "coincidence"

time:2022-12-09 09:42:27source:monlittlebaby.com author:Emergency treatment
Does your baby have a fever as soon as he has teeth? Multiple studies suggest it's just a "coincidence"

*For reference only for medical professionals. If your baby's body temperature (armpit temperature) exceeds 38°C during teething, or is accompanied by poor spirits, decreased breastfeeding, or other obvious accompanying symptoms, you should seek medical attention in the outpatient clinic in time. A child about 1 year old with fever came over and asked, "Doctor, please help me to see if my child's fever is caused by teething?". What's more, the child has a fever when the permanent teeth are replaced at the age of six or seven, which is also said to be caused by the replacement of the teeth. When the baby has a fever when it happens to be teething, many parents think that it is related to the teething, and they do not seek medical treatment in time, which delays the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Does teething really make it hot? Under what circumstances should vigilance not be teething fever? What should you do when your baby is teething? Will the baby's body temperature rise after teething? Although the eruption of deciduous teeth is a natural process of children's development, experts have different opinions on whether it has an impact on children's health. Erupting teeth may be accompanied by different benign symptoms such as increased salivation, irritability, loss of appetite for solid food, and elevated body temperature. A survey on the symptoms of deciduous teeth eruption in infants and young children [1], using clinical examination or questionnaires to parents or medical staff, the local and systemic signs and symptoms during the spontaneous eruption of deciduous teeth in healthy children aged 0-36 months. Observational study of the occurrence. The local and systemic signs and symptoms assessed were all teething-related complications described in the study (eg, decreased appetite, diarrhea, drooling, fever, inflammation, swelling, gum blisters or ulcers, irritability, rash, runny nose) , sleep disturbance, vomiting, etc.). The study showed an overall prevalence of 70.5% of signs and symptoms associated with the eruption of primary teeth in children aged 0-36 months. Among them, gingival irritation, irritability, and drooling were the most common, accounting for 86.81%, 68.19%, and 55.72%, respectively. Fever accounts for 20%-30%. Hulland et al. observed that 85% of 128 teeth in 21 children had gingival congestion during early eruption. Chakraborty et al reported fewer local symptoms in anterior teeth than posterior teeth. King et al suggested that local signs may be confused with oral herpes infection. Shapira et al. observed increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in crevicular fluid around teething. However, Galili et al. found that teething at multiple sites at the same time was associated with disease. Wake et al reported that the eruption of deciduous teeth was not associated with symptoms. Jaber et al found that teething in children was associated with fever. RamosJorge et al found that children's body temperature increased only slightly, with an average temperature ranging from 36.9°C to 37.1°C on non-teething days and 37.6°C on teething days. Another analysis of studies discussing the relationship between the eruption of deciduous teeth and elevated body temperature in infants and young children [2], came to the opposite conclusion that there was little association between teething and fever. The authors analyzed six studies that included a total of 753 children. Four of the studies were included in a meta-analysis that showed no association between budding and fever. It concluded that the limitations of the included evidence made it insufficient to determine whether there was an association between eruption and fever. Another meta-study analysis [3]: this search strategy retrieved 53 articles, 49 of which were excluded from the analysis, and 4 articles were finally included. Articles included two meta-analyses as well as two original studies with a total of 5317 children. The results of the study show that due to the limitations of the included studies and the inconsistent conclusions, it is impossible to draw a precise relationship between teething and fever, but there are indeed several studies that show a slight increase in body temperature on the day of sprouting. To sum up, the relationship between the germination and growth of deciduous teeth and fever may not be large. Even if there is a fluctuation in body temperature, it generally does not persist or the body temperature is too high. The slight fluctuation in body temperature may be related to local inflammation of the gums during teething. Under what circumstances should vigilance not be teething fever? Not all babies will have a rise in body temperature when they are teething. If the baby's body temperature (armpit temperature) exceeds 38°C during the teething period, or is accompanied by poor spirits, decreased breastfeeding, or other obvious accompanying symptoms, you should seek medical attention in time. At this time, it may be caused by other diseases and should not be mistaken for teething. Physiological phenomenon caused. Otherwise, the diagnosis and treatment of the disease will be delayed. How to deal with mild fever when baby is teething? During the period of teething, the baby had mild fever and normal appetite. After examination by the doctor, no other diseases could be found. Then you need to take care of your baby's mouth, for example: feed more boiled water, and wipe the gums with wet gauze to clean the mouth and ensure oral hygiene. After the deciduous teeth erupt, the hypothermia will disappear; during this period, parents should make a temperature record, carefully observe and record the baby's spirit, reaction, feeding, etc., and do not take it lightly; for those who drool more during teething, they should use clean water in time. Wipe off with a small towel to keep your baby's face and neck dry to avoid eczema. Once you find small red papules around the mouth, apply ointment as directed by the doctor; in addition, pay attention to the proper adjustment of the baby's diet during the teething period, and add some hard food appropriately to train the baby's chewing ability. References: [1] A Nemezio Mariana, Mh De Oliveira Katharina, C Romualdo Priscilla, M Queiroz Alexandra, Wg Paula-E-Silva Francisco, Ab Silva Raquel, C Küchler Erika. Association between Fever and Primary Tooth Eruption: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.[J].International journal of clinical pediatric dentistry,2017,10(3).[2]Romina Brignardello-Petersen.Insufficient evidence about the association between primary tooth eruption and fever[J].The Journal of the American Dental Association, 2018, 149(4). [3] Fever from Primary Tooth Eruption: What is the evidence? [J]. Nascer e Crescer-Revista do Hospital de Crianças Maria Pia, 2018, 27(4). This article was first published : Medical Pediatrics Channel Author of this article: Shao Cailin Editor-in-charge: Xiang Yu All the pediatric clinical knowledge Doctor Station App you want to see 👇1. Scan the QR code below the code 2. Click "Download Now" to download the Doctor Station App, and subscribe anytime, anywhere La~ Copyright statement The original article of this article is welcome to forward it to the circle of friends - End - The medical community strives for the accuracy and reliability of its published content when it is approved, but does not regard the timeliness of the published content and the accuracy and completeness of the cited materials (if any). The company makes any promises and guarantees, and does not assume any responsibility due to the outdated content, the possible inaccuracy or incompleteness of the cited information, etc. Relevant parties are requested to check separately when adopting or using it as a basis for decision-making.
Related content