Early childhood education: why my child is suitable for "slow parenting"

time:2022-09-27 06:01:44source:monlittlebaby.com author:Fever
Early childhood education: why my child is suitable for "slow parenting"

Some families define success as creating activities that their children participate in. But one mother explains why it's best to give kids a little time to schedule their boredom. It's Saturday morning, and there's only one thing on my family's schedule today, and that's the Monopoly marathon. No, it's not raining outside, it's not too cold or too hot, it's just a normal Saturday, my two daughters (ages 12 and 9), my husband and I will choose to sit at a table and enjoy each other's company. In our family, we practice “slow parenting,” a type of parenting in which parents consciously choose to relieve their children of stress and allow them to explore their world on their own terms. It allows everyone to be present and focus on family time rather than the activities on the calendar. "Slow" was exactly one of my childhood lifestyles, although it wasn't necessarily the one my parents chose. It was just a different time and parents didn't have much time to pay attention to us. Because of this, we have the opportunity for leisure and the freedom to understand life in our own way. Moms and dads don't seem to be taught the need to take action to settle, appease, spoil, coax, or entertain us. Before the Internet boom, the cause and effect of boredom is not someone else's problem, but your own. We've found a way to deal with it without too much hassle -- and that's actually a good thing, experts say. Slow parenting is actually giving our children space to learn how to manage their emotions. Loyalty, love and forgiveness are also important life lessons. When parents give children room for trial and error, children become proficient at problem-solving on their own. These children rely on their inner resources to creatively find solutions. They don't expect or expect an adult to rush to rescue them, and problem-solving on their own helps children develop confidence, resourcefulness, and a sense of control. But parenting styles have changed over the years, especially as societal pressures for perfection increase. Stress makes people do more and more things, and people seem to need to make sure every minute is getting the most out of it, forgetting to enjoy any minute of it. Many parents choose their parenting style based on their definition of success. For some, the form of success is writing a healthy, excellent "resume" for their children. This equation usually boils down to the fact that the more activities a child engages in, the better their chances of success. In some ways, giving your kids too much time feels like a modern-day comparison. Parents intentionally teach their children important life lessons through outdoor activities and team sports, which are often a combination of friendship, resilience, and teamwork. But other families, including mine, opted for "slow parenting." The term was coined by Carl Honoré in his book The Praise of Slow: Challenging the Mania for Speed. This style roughly translates to less activity, less movement, and less hard time. It also means more time with family. We choose to allow our children to learn important skills in family dynamics. Allowing our daughters to argue with each other, we think it teaches them more about conflict resolution than any football game or team. Arguing with siblings is a safe way to test boundaries, as there is usually nowhere to escape at this point. Because living under the same roof, your siblings won't turn you away. (Well, even if they can do it temporarily, eventually someone will give in.) Slow parenting gives our kids room to learn how to manage their emotions. And learn important life lessons about loyalty, love, and forgiveness in the process. As my daughter entered her teens, I embraced the changes to come, and I wasn't worried. When they were little, I could choose the activities for kids to attend and skip, and I could help them prioritize our family, but today, I can see the fruits of my slow education. My daughters can now choose how they spend their time, but they will still choose to be with us. Life is not yet stressful for them. A lifetime of responsibility will provide them with many such opportunities later on. At the same time, my job is to reduce stress for the kids because this is where they should live, without burdens. I don't need to create perfection for my kids. I just need to give them enough space and enough love to understand their place in the world. English original: https://www.parents.com/parenting/better-parenting/style/why-slow-parenting-is-right-for-my-family/ (Please do not reprint without permission) Note: Copyright It is owned by the original author, and we have done a Chinese translation. If there is any infringement, please contact us to delete it.
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